Community garden Canada

Growing Forward
2015-2016

2015 was a turning point in international development for the world, for Canada, and for Canadian Feed The Children.

THANK YOU FOR BEING PART OF IT WITH US.

The UN launched its 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

The agenda sets out 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aimed at eradicating poverty and “leaving no one behind.” CFTC’s food security and education work is well-aligned with the 2030 SDGs, in particular #1, “No Poverty” and #2, “Zero Hunger”.

Global Affairs Canada began its mandate to refocus Canada’s development assistance on helping the poorest and most vulnerable

GAC is creating a new framework to guide Canada’s aid decisions, empower people, and support broad-based, sustainable growth in the developing world with an emphasis on women and girls and on the climate. In May 2016 GAC sought input through its International Assistance Review (IAR) from all Canadians, including civil society organizations.

CFTC achieved two of its key “Journey to Change” (2012-2016) strategic priorities one year ahead of schedule

We reached our institutional funding revenue goal when we were selected to assume responsibility for the GAC-funded RESULT and MILEAR projects, which have enabled us to deepen our work in food security. We also continue to refine our Theory of Change focus on food security and education outcomes that are central to making lasting improvements to children’s lives.

GROWING FORWARD
WITH FOOD SECURITY PROJECTS

Resilient and Sustainable Livelihoods Transformation (RESULT) in northern Ghana, and Market-Led Improved Livelihoods in Eastern Amhara Region (MILEAR) in Ethiopia are multi-year, broad-based projects funded generously by Global Affairs Canada and CFTC’s donors.

Like Climate Change Adaptation in Northern Ghana Enhanced (CHANGE) before them, RESULT and MILEAR support smallholder farmers to achieve increased food security, improved agricultural production, better nutrition and greater income in some of the world’s most impoverished and climate-challenged communities.

change
makes change

With Climate Change Adaptation in Northern Ghana Enhanced (CHANGE), which wrapped up in December 2015:

  • 2,000+ farmers in 17 communities in northern Ghana have increased their awareness of climate change, and are now using climate-smart agricultural (CSA) practices and weather information to improve their agricultural productivity.
  • 400,000+ farmers gained the same skills through radio programs.
  • 93% of farmers tested one or more CSA method and 95% of farmers who implemented CSA strategies (e.g., planting drought-resilient seeds and planting across slopes) reported increased farm productivity
  • 66% of farmers learning and using CSA skills were women
  • Post-harvest losses were reduced by an estimated 70% among farmers who were trained on improved post-harvest techniques
What I want to say is that it wasn’t possible for people like us to make up to 2 – 3 million (GH¢200-300). With the support of CHANGE however, I am now able to make that much money per year, and I am able to pay for my children’s health insurance. That is how helpful the increase in income has been to us.
Basketweaver, Upper East Region, Ghana
getting a great
result

Resilient and Sustainable Livelihoods Transformation (RESULT) is increasing the food security of 120,000 vulnerable people in the Upper East and Upper West Regions of northern Ghana. With improved skills, knowledge, and access to agricultural inputs and technology, farmers have significantly increased their yields and the survival rate of their animals, and women are more active participants in household decision-making:

  • 80% of farmers (male and female) continue to apply climate-smart agricultural practices such as planting in rows
  • About 60% are applying good animal husbandry practices with 3/4 of farmers’ goats and sheep surviving (compared to only two-thirds at the start of the project)
  • Over 75% of farmers can access extension services for crop and animal production, and can access loans to finance their production or household needs
  • Close to 80% of basket weaving, beekeeping, groundnut processing, shea butter processing and soap making groups are producing as a group (instead of as individuals)
  • Maize yields have more than doubled for men and women; groundnut yields have tripled for men and quintupled for women
  • Three-quarters of women now say their economic contribution to the household is strongly recognized. Women have also sustained or increased their access to land and labour, and have increased their influence in project-based groups.
I am the household breadwinner. Before the RESULT project came to my community, I had to scratch the surface of the earth daily to put food on the table for my five children and aged mother. We ran out of grains and I had to sell a pig to buy foodstuffs to supplement our diet.
Mwinpog Dan-yi, RESULT Participant, Ghana
growing hope with
milear

Market-Led Improved Livelihoods in Eastern Amhara Region (MILEAR) is helping more than 40,000 children, youth, women and men in Ethiopia increase their crop yields, boost family income, and lift themselves out of poverty. In response to the severe drought in the Horn of Africa, MILEAR has ramped up its support to by helping farmers plant, harvest and market drought-resistant crops, and is increasing their access to water.

  • The number of households with access to irrigation has increased from 16.5% to 36.6%
  • The percentage of households involved in the production and marketing of high-value crops has increased up to five times
  • Farmers are becoming less dependent on monoculture crops susceptible to failure in times of drought
  • Close to 80% of basket weaving, beekeeping, groundnut processing, shea butter processing and soap making groups are producing as a group (instead of as individuals)
  • Farmers, in particular women, have much better access to agriculture extension services
Now I have five milking cows and I am no longer selling animals to buy food grains. I am able to buy enough sorghum for my family to eat for the year.
Hussien, MILEAR Participant, Ethiopia

Feeding children,
fuelling growth in
first nations communities

One in four First Nations children, almost double the national average, lives in poverty and arrives at school hungry. We work in Canada to help communities create opportunities for healthy, prosperous, food-secure futures.

School Meals

Providing nutritious meals and snacks to ensure First Nations children have the energy and focus they need to learn and grow. In 2015, CFTC funded: • half a million meals and snacks • seven school and community centre-based school food programs • access to affordable fruits and vegetables through Good Food Box or Fresh for Less initiatives for community members

Nutrition Education

Giving children the knowledge they need to make healthy food choices when they leave the classroom. - healthy eating instruction, recipe contests, and cooking classes teach meal planning and safe food preparation - communications encourage student and family participation - Youth Champions mentor younger students on healthy eating and food-related initiatives - school gardens teach students where their food comes from, and let them grow and harvest food

Community Mobilization

Engaging communities in broad-based nutrition, food and wellness activities such as:
• collective kitchens and community gardens that extend the benefits of school meal and nutrition education programs beyond the school to the broader community
• reinvigorating cultural practices around food sharing and traditional foods
• creating opportunities for intergenerational learning and reinforce the traditional relationship between the community and the land

The food is healthier now. There is healthy pizza and whole wheat spaghetti.
Student
Now we don’t need to worry about having food. It’s always there if we need it.
Student

Thank you

To every one of our generous donors, we extend our deepest gratitude for your support in 2015. Our many leadership donors give significant and multi-year gifts, and provide CFTC with the foundation for long-term planning and programming excellence.



This year, we’d like to especially recognize:


Global Affairs Canada – for its funding of the RESULT and MILEAR projects, now providing sustainable, climate-smart agricultural support to more than 160,000 people in northern Ghana and Ethiopia

Ipsos Foundation – for their gift to rebuild a school in Kpachelo, Ghana providing 248 children with a safe place to learn and thrive

The Slaight Family Foundation for four years of funding to launch Healthy Bodies, Healthy Minds - a food security program designed to reach 20 new First Nation communities by 2020.

Ipsos Foundation – for their gift to rebuild a school in Kpachelo, Ghana providing 248 children with a safe place to learn and thrive

Financials

In 2015, CFTC continued to refine our focus and priorities as defined by our global Theory of Change, and invested significantly through our local partners in Ethiopia, Ghana, Uganda, Bolivia and Canada.

The graph on this page reflects CFTC’s evolution over the past five years to a model that is designed to deliver sustainable impact over the long-term in our three Theory of Change areas of focus by diversifying our revenue base and deepening our investment in food security.

growing positive
futures for children
internationally

CFTC’s commitment to excellence in programming continued to deliver impact for children through our core food security and education programming in Bolivia, Ethiopia, Ghana and Uganda in 2015 and 2016.

With the additional investments we were able to make in Ethiopia and Ghana through MILEAR and RESULT, we are now reaching more than 125,000 children and adults directly and another 150,000+ community members indirectly.

growing
food security

CFTC donors are supporting greater availability of food by investing in agricultural techniques that counter the effects of climate variability. Donors are also contributing to initiatives that improve people’s incomes, with a special focus on women’s livelihoods.

And we continue to feed children directly (through school food programs) and ensure that people have the resources to provide nutritious, healthy food for children at home, all year long.



in 2015
30,356
farmers received agricultural training
21,807
farmers received seeds, tools, plants, livestock, and other farming basics

Growing food security
Agricultural Productivity

Improving agricultural productivity increases the amount of food available to smallholder farm families. Climate-smart agricultural training, agricultural inputs like drought-resistant seeds and livestock, and irrigation equipment enable families to produce more food and feed their children all year long. These activities are supported by school and community gardens, family nutrition education, and alternative agricultural income generation activities like beekeeping, aquaculture, and dry season gardening.

 
Growing food security
Income Generation

Helping people earn more money improves access to food. It helps create robust, resilient communities that can invest in their own development in ways that are specific to them, and led by them. Sustainable, community-led economic development demands that women be included and provided equal access to resources and decision-making. Self-help groups, Village Savings & Loans Associations (VSLAs) and other micro-finance groups assist people to earn and save income and provide a better life for their families.


in 2015
21,951
SHG and VSLA members earning income, saving and borrowing
6 out of 10
farmers were women
 
in 2015
5.05 million
meals and snacks were provided to school children
46
school gardens were planted

Growing food security
School Food Programs

Helping people earn more money improves access to food. It helps create robust, resilient communities that can invest in their own development in ways that are specific to them, and led by them. Sustainable, community-led economic development demands that women be included and provided equal access to resources and decision-making. Self-help groups, Village Savings & Loans Associations (VSLAs) and other micro-finance groups assist people to earn and save income and provide a better life for their families.

 
Since I started rearing goats and earning an income from them, my children are now happy and hopeful. I am able to provide adequate food for my children and pay for school expenses. My children’s future is bright!
Woinshet, Self-Help Group member, Ethiopia

growing
education

Access to comprehensive early childhood care and education and quality primary education is one of the most important factors in future life outcomes. Together, we are ensuring that children, especially girls, can attend, remain in and graduate from school, and take advantage of the increased self-esteem and better life outcomes that education brings.



in 2015
45,473
students attended primary school
164
primary school teachers were recruited and trained
10
new water sanitation facilities were installed
66
classrooms were restocked with school supplies and equipment
 
I would have quit school. Now that the school is better supplied, I am able to attend regularly. I will complete my education through Grade 8 in this school and will pass on to high school to continue my education.
Emebet, Student, Ethiopia

growing
capacity

CFTC builds capacity of our local partners to help them achieve best practices in governance and financial management. Strong local partners are then capable of supporting community-led development that builds sustainably resilient households and communities.

We also fund work that builds capacity, resilience and self-reliance in communities directly through community groups such as farmer-based organizations (FBOs), village savings and loans associations, and business co-ops like basket weavers’ groups. These groups work to drive economic and social development that strengthens and sustains the entire community.



in 2015
826
Self-help groups and village savings and loans associations were operating

164
primary school teachers were recruited and trained
 
Thank you!
You've made a tremendous difference for children around the world in 2015/16! Thanks to your commitment and compassion, CFTC has been able to grow to new heights in achieving high-impact, innovative programming that unlocks children’s potential through community-led action. Together with you, we are helping to create a world where children thrive.